I don’t care vs I don’t give a damn

I don’t care vs I don’t give a damn | WordReference Forums

Dec 22, 2008 · I don’t care seems to be more in line with a lack of interest in an event/activty in general, whereas I don’t give a damn seems to mean that a person is resign to the outcome or eventuality of something, so they have written off any attempt to try and change that outcome or eventuality

Frankly, My Dear, I Don’t Give a Damn. | WordReference Forums Mar 11, 2010
I don’t give a damn! | WordReference Forums Oct 30, 2007

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Urban Dictionary: I don’t give a damn

= I don’t care. Get a I don’t give a damn mug for your girlfriend Riley.

Michel (Sweet Mickey) Martelly – I Don’t Care – YouTube

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Sep 07, 2008 · “I Don’t Care” by Michel “Sweet Micky” Martelly

Autor: nkzeroG

Z-Ro – I Don’t Give A Damn – YouTube

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Oct 05, 2009 · From Cocain 2009. Our new desktop experience was built to be your music destination. Listen to official albums & more.

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verbs – ‘Give a damn’ OR ‘Don’t give a damn’? – English

Some people, when they say, “I could|couldn’t give a damn”, mean that they don’t give a damn. They don’t care at all about something. For many speakers, with such exclamations the meaning is conveyed in the tone , and they don’t bother about the literal meaning of the words.

TheFreeDictionary could be clearer; essentially, what it means is something more like the Wiktionary definition : give a damn (third-person singular simple present gives a damn, present participle giving a damn, simple past gave a damn, past participle given a damn) To be concerned about, have an interest in, to care (about something). Frankly, my dear, I don’t give a damn. I’d question the assertion that it’s always used in the negative; the Wiktionary entry lists a non-negative construction, and so others surely exist, such as your example. To TRomano’s point about the confusion: I believe the phonologically reduced n’t in couldn’t causes the expression’s meaning to be carried in the intonation rather than the lexicogrammar. That is, because the n’t is so difficult to hear sometimes, the following sentences can have the same meaning, depending on the tone: I couldn’t care less
I could care less Having said that, I’m not sure the change is complete for give a damn , or even that it’s necessarily the same thing. I’d want to see more examples of them. For instance, COCA provides the following results: (A) -not/n’t GIVE a damn 252

(B) not/n’t GIVE a damn 547
(C) not/n’t * GIVE a damn 24
Note that in the above results, * means one word and not any number of characters as it common RE. 1 Additionally, GIVE means the lemma – all forms of – give ( given , giving , gives ) Firstly, what this shows – even if there could be distant, non-negative constructions – is that overwhelmingly it is used in the negative, but not always. Consider the excerpt from (A) (above, apologies for the small text here’s a direct link ), in particular the ones without negation; lines 3 and 15. These examples don’t have any distant or proximal negation, and their meanings are clear. For (3), it is we are smart enough to care . For (15), it is How am I going to care about selling someone a T-1 line? Of course, language changes, and spoken language so much more rapidly than written language. If give a damn adopts the same meaning whether it is negated or not, it is still in the process of doing so. Also note that having a negative connotation is not the same as being negated; things can have a negative connotation (“have bad axiological relations”) and not be negated. And , looking at the corpus data for hoot and shit (links below), the same is true for them; they retain both a negated and non-negated meaning. She does not give a damn about her job = She gives a damn about her job tl;dr: No, at the very least, the above clauses are not equivalent yet , and I’m not sure they’re in the process of becoming equivalent. This applies to hoot and shit as well. Here are links for each of the searches: -n’t/not GIVE a damn | damn OR hoot OR shit n’t/not GIVE a damn | damn OR hoot OR shit n’t/not * GIVE a damn | damn OR hoot OR shit5
There is a novel with the title: “The girl who gave a damn”. I’ve been trying to figure out whether the title means she was against traditional practices or was simply one who acted according to her instinct. Mrs Scholastica Lawrie, its author, seems to suggest the latter – instinctive behaviour which was not necessarily aimed at challenging tradition. In spite of the few examples which suggest positive usage of the idiomatic expression, I tend to see and experience usages which connote negative usage. Really, I don’t give a damn about its few positives. I just see a negative expression. Apart from it being common in informal usage, it doesn’t often give an impression of a polite usage.1These exclamations have gotten confused, just like “could care less|couldn’t care less”. Some people, when they say, “I could care less” mean that they couldn’t care less. They don’t care at all about something. Some people, when they say, “I could|couldn’t give a damn”, mean that they don’t give a damn. They don’t care at all about something. For many speakers, with such exclamations the meaning is conveyed in the tone , and they don’t bother about the literal meaning of the words.0If you couldn’t care less you could not care any less than you do right now. If you could care less you could care less than you do right now. The extreme is couldn’t which is on the negative side and isn’t that the whole point. I’m not sure I communicated this intelliagably or not but I hope it’s clear.

How to Say ‘I don’t give a damn’ in Italian | ITALY Magazine

If something is stressing you out in Italy, you could say you don’t care or, more colloquially, you don’t give a damn. In Italian this would be: Non mi importa , Non …

50 I Don’t Care Quotes For Your Current Mood (October. 2018)

3. The less you give a damn, the happier you will be. — The earlier you understand this, the happier you would be. The more you care about the things in your life, the more you will screw up.

Frankly, my dear, I don’t give a damn – Wikipedia

“Frankly, my dear, I don’t give a damn” is a line from the 1939 film Gone with the Wind starring Clark Gable and Vivien Leigh. The line is spoken by Rhett Butler (Gable), as his last words to Scarlett O’Hara (Leigh), in response to her tearful question: “Where shall I go? What shall I do?”

dict.cc Wörterbuch :: I don’t give a damn :: Englisch

Frankly, my dear, I don’t give a damn. [Gone with the Wind] Offen gesagt ist mir das gleichgültig.filmquote I don’t / couldn’t give a damn about it. [coll.]

don’t give a damn – Traduction française – Linguee

Unfortunately it is just a continuation of the “don’t care, don’t give a damn” attitude of the Liberal government toward the province of British Columbia. www2.parl.gc.ca Malheureusement, c’est simplement une autre manifestation de l’attitude de « je-m’en-foutisme » que le gouvernement libéral affiche à l’égard de la Colombie-Britannique.